Border Point Dog: Pictures, Info, Care Guide & More

Are you looking to adopt a canine companion? Have you been searching for the perfect breed to play the role of both pet and working dog but have had no luck thus far? If so, we have just the dog for you!

You may not be familiar with the Border Point, as it’s still relatively new and unknown, but these pups are a combination of two working dog breeds, making them suitable for a variety of tasks. They’re also affectionate and loyal to their families, making them fantastic pets. Here’s what to know about this dog breed!

Breed Overview

Height:

23–27 inches

Weight:

35–65 pounds

Lifespan:

11–15 years

Colors:

Combinations of tan, black, brown, and white

Suitable for:

Families with older children, hunters, those with yards

Temperament:

Protective, alert, affectionate, independent

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As you might have guessed from the name, the Border Point is a hybrid dog breed created from the Border Collie and Pointer breeds. Besides being awfully cute, this combination means the Border Point inherits both hunting instincts and herding skills, making them well-suited for a variety of work. These pups also inherit a ton of energy, so one must be incredibly active to keep up with them!

Border Point Dog Characteristics

High-energy dogs will need a lot of mental and physical stimulation to stay happy and healthy, while low-energy dogs require minimal physical activity. It’s important when choosing a dog to make sure their energy levels match your lifestyle or vice versa.

Trainability
Easy-to-train dogs are more skilled at learning prompts and actions quickly with minimal training. Dogs that are harder to train will require a bit more patience and practice.

Some breeds, due to their size or their breeds potential genetic health issues, have shorter lifespans than others. Proper exercise, nutrition, and hygiene also play an important role in the lifespan of your pet.

Some dog breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems, and some more than others. This doesn’t mean that every dog will have these issues, but they have an increased risk, so it’s important to understand and prepare for any additional needs they may require.

Sociability
Some dog breeds are more social than others, both towards humans and other dogs. More social dogs have a tendency to run up to strangers for pets and scratches, while less social dogs shy away and are more cautious, even potentially aggressive. No matter the breed, it’s important to socialize your dog and expose them to lots of different situations.

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Border Point Puppies

The Border Point is still a relatively unknown hybrid mix, so you will almost definitely have to purchase a puppy through a breeder. You might have a bit of difficulty locating breeders in your area, so be prepared for some travel! Also, because this breed isn’t yet a popular one, you’ll likely have to pay a fair bit for one. Ensure you’re going through a reputable breeder; otherwise, you could run into health and behavioral issues with your pup further down the road.

Border Point Dog Origin & History

The exact origins of the Border Point are unclear. However, we do know the origins of the parent breeds.

The Border Collie has been around for over a hundred years and originated in the area between England and Scotland’s borders (hence, their name!). The breed’s original role was as sheep herders, and their development throughout history has been closely tied to the work of livestock farming and wool trade.

The Pointer has their origins in England, where the breed was first recorded around 1650. This breed is a working dog like the Border Collie, but they are used for hunting rather than herding.

Parent Breeds of Border Point Dog
Image Credit: (L) Koen Adriaenssen, Shutterstock | (R) otsphoto, Shutterstock

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Temperament & Intelligence of the Border Point Dog

Because the Border Point is a hybrid breed, these dogs inherit personality traits from both the Border Collie and the Pointer. Both parent breeds are protective, alert, and quick to act on instinct, so the same is likely true for the Border Point. Both parent breeds are also known for being loyal, hardworking, and courageous, so the Border Point should inherit those same traits. All these traits make the Border Point a fantastic watchdog!

Besides that, the Border Point is highly active and intelligent. If these pups don’t have a specific job to do and enough exercise each day, they could quickly become bored and turn to mischief. Another thing to note is that the Border Collie and the Pointer are both talkative breeds who engage in plenty of vocalization, so this pup likely does, too!

Are These Dogs Good for Families? 👪

The Border Pointer can make a wonderful family pet (as long as they also have a job to do and get enough exercise), but they would probably do best in families with older children. How tolerant this dog is of kids will come down to which parent breed they take after most. Border Collies are incredibly tolerant of children, while the Pointer is less tolerant. So, the Border Pointer could go either way or land somewhere in the middle on the patience with children scale. Plus, this breed is large enough that they could knock down small children during play.

Dog German short haired pointer outdoor in woods(Border Point Dog - as per vet)
Image Credit: Philip Constantine, Shutterstock

Does This Breed Get Along With Other Pets? 🐶 😽

If a Border Point is socialized well and from a young age, they are more likely to get along with other dogs in the household. However, the chances of them getting along with cats or smaller animals are slim, as these dogs have a high prey drive and will likely give chase. With enough hard work, you may be able to accomplish having them safely around felines, but always keep a close eye on these pups when they are around smaller pets.

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Things to Know When Owning a Border Point Dog

If you want to own a Border Point, there’s plenty more you should know, like how much exercise they need daily, the kinds of health issues they may be prone to, and how to groom them.

Food & Diet Requirements 🦴

All canines should consume high-quality dog food; the Border Point is no different. However, this breed will require high-protein food to keep up with their high energy needs. Getting food created specifically for medium-sized dogs will also be beneficial, as it will include all the nutrients your dog needs. Speak with your vet about how much to feed your Border Point; they may only be medium-sized but expend a lot of energy, so they may need more calories than the average medium-sized breed.

Exercise 🐕

The Border Point is an incredibly high-energy and active canine. As such, they aren’t well-suited to apartment dwellings; they also may not be well-suited to city life in general. This dog needs wide open spaces where they can run. That said, those wide-open spaces do need to be fenced in! The Pointer is a dog that often uses their nose, so the Border Point will likely do the same. If your pup picks up a scent and follows it, they could easily wander off.

When it comes to how much exercise a day you’re looking at, aim for an hour minimum. This pup will enjoy a range of activities, including agility, long walks, hiking, running, flyball, and playtime at home.

Training 🎾

This breed should be fairly easy to train, as they are intelligent working dogs who are quick to pick up on new things. The breed is likely eager to please, which will help immensely in training. Keep giving them tasks and commands that challenge them to think and test their problem-solving skills; these pups will thrive! Remember to keep things positive, though; never use negative reinforcement while training your pup.

Don’t forget the early socialization, either! These canines are friendly, but because they’re wary of strangers and constantly alert, a lack of socialization could cause them to be overly fearful of strange people and animals, which could result in them lashing out.

Finally, if you don’t want a dog who barks at every little sound, you’ll need to train your Border Point out of that habit!

Grooming ✂️

Border Points are fairly low maintenance when it comes to grooming, but how often you need to brush them depends, in part, on which parent breed they most resemble. They should be brushed weekly if they have the denser coat of the Border Collie. If they have the coat of the Pointer, though, a quick brushing once every couple of weeks should suffice.  Your dog should also be bathed as needed (when they get dirty) with a gentle shampoo, like an oatmeal one. Other than that, clean out their ears with a soft cloth weekly to avoid infection, brush their teeth often, and keep those toenails trimmed!

Health and Conditions 🏥

This breed is still relatively new enough that not much is known about what health conditions they may acquire. However, their parent breeds are prone to certain conditions, which makes it more likely the Border Point is, too.

Minor Conditions
  • Cataracts
  • Cherry Eye
Serious Conditions
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Epilepsy
  • Addison’s Disease

Male vs Female

There don’t seem to be any significant differences in temperament between the female and male Border Point Collie. However, in appearance, males may be just a touch larger than females.

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3 Little-Known Facts About the Border Point Dog

What else is there to know about the Border Point dog? Take a look!

1. This breed needs lots of mental stimulation.

It isn’t only physical stimulation the Border Point will need; these pups will also require constant mental stimulation. As working dogs, they’re used to having something to do, so if you merely leave them to their own devices, they’ll find their own “jobs” to do! Stocking up on puzzle toys will be a necessity.


2. The Border Point is likely a fantastic hunting companion.

With the combination of the Pointer’s nose and hunting instincts and the Border Collie’s herding skills, this breed may very well be one of the better hunting dogs around.


3. These dogs thrive on challenges.

As such, activities such as agility training, obedience training, and other canine sports will be right up their alley. Get your pup involved in some of these activities, and they’re sure to be thrilled.

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Final Thoughts

Border Point dogs haven’t been around for very long and aren’t exceptionally well-known yet, but they truly can make wonderful pets for the right person or family. The breed does require plenty of space to run around, though, and a ton of exercise each day, so be sure you have what it takes to hang with one of these pups! If you do, you’ll find yourself with a combination working and companion canine who is affectionate, loyal, and protective.


Featured Image Credit: Mary Swift, Shutterstock

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